• Health

    Mother-of-two who is allergic to the SUN reveals how she controls her painful condition

    Tammy Pardy was five when she suffered her first allergic reaction to the sun. While other kids caught a bit of sunburn, Tammy's arms, legs and face erupted in a painful, bumpy red rash.  At first, her parents thought it was eczema or reaction to some kind of food. But it soon became apparent that after just five minutes in the sun, she would break out.Dealing with it as a child was painful in more ways than one, she says. Her classmates in primary school in Ontario, Canada, would tease her, calling her a liar and an attention-seeker. 'You can't be allergic to ...

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    Marijuana addiction is real: Forget 'gateway drug' fears - 4 million Americans are hooked on weed

    Marijuana is now legal - for either medical or recreational use - in 31 states and strains are getting stronger and stronger. Its legalization has been buoyed by ever-growing evidence that it does not have debilitating health consequences of other federally outlawed substances.  Yet the National Institutes of Health estimate that four million Americans are addicted to marijuana. The drug is becoming easier to access and more potent in more places, increasing the risks of addiction, yet there are addiction treatment medications, such as we have for alcohol and opioids, for treating marijuana addiction. Marijuana has a long-standing reputation as a 'gateway drug': an ...

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  • Health

    America approves its first ever marijuana-based drug

    US health regulators on Monday approved the first prescription drug made from marijuana, a milestone that could spur more research into a drug that remains illegal under federal law, despite growing legalization for recreational and medical use.The Food and Drug Administration approved the medication, called Epidiolex, to treat two rare forms of epilepsy that begin in childhood. But it's not quite medical marijuana.The strawberry-flavored syrup is a purified form of a chemical ingredient found in the cannabis plant - but not the one that gets users high. It's not yet clear why the ingredient, called cannabidiol, or CBD, reduces seizures ...

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    Doctors stunned as baby in North Carolina with fatal MPS7 goes home

    When Skylar Rodriguez was born three months early on November 22 last year, the doctors braced her mother and father for the worst.She was so swollen she couldn't make a sound or open her eyelids. Soon, DNA tests revealed she had MPS7, or 'Sly syndrome', an incredibly rare disease which affects just 150 people in the world. She is one of the first sufferers on the east coast. Skylar would be lucky to live more than 24 hours, they told 22-year-old first-time parents Hunter Howard and Joshua Rodriguez, who had just graduated college.Now, seven months later, those same doctors are stunned as ...

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    Babies born just one month premature may be at a higher risk of developing ADHD

    Babies born just one month premature are more likely to develop attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in later life, new research suggests.Infants born at less than 34 weeks are more at risk of ADHD symptoms, such as hyperactivity or short attention spans, a study found today.  Hyperactivity is more common in premature babies, while short attention spans affect such infants in later life, the research adds. For unclear reasons, the results are particularly true of girls. Previous findings suggest premature babies have underdeveloped organs, which can lead to inflammation and hormonal changes that cause ADHD. Around one in 10 babies in the US ...

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    Men who grew up in privileged households produce more testosterone and

    Men who have privileged and disease-free childhoods grow up to have more testosterone, scientists say.A study found the body is likely to put more resources into creating testosterone if it does not have to fend off serious infections or compensate for a poor diet.Higher levels of the hormone can make men stronger and more fertile, but may also increase the risk of prostate enlargement or cancer. Very low levels, on the other hand, can lead to infertility, a low libido or a lack of energy.Researchers now say a man's testosterone levels are 'largely determined' by his upbringing rather than his race ...

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  • Health

    Baby food in the firing line over obesity: Officials will examine if it is too sugary

    Health officials will examine whether baby food is too sugary, a new report reveals.As part of a plan to tackle childhood obesity, the Government will review products aimed at infants and youngsters, according to today's report 'Childhood obesity: a plan for action'.The report follows a similar plan released in 2016, which led to the sugar tax on soft drinks coming into play on April 6, as well as food manufacturers such as Kellogg’s cutting up to 40 per cent of sugar from their children's cereals.The UK Government aims to halve children obesity rates by 2030, the report adds.Nearly a quarter ...

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    Obesity fuels anxiety and depression by disrupting gut bacteria that affect the brain, study finds

    Obesity makes people more anxious and depressed by changing the bacteria in the gut - our 'second brain' - new research suggests.   Scientists found that a high fat diet alters the type of bacteria that live in the gut and these play a role in these mental disorders.Obese people and those with type 2 diabetes suffer more negative feelings that others, but scientists have not previously been able to work out why this happens.Researchers at Harvard Medical School  discovered that mice fed a high-fat diet showed significantly anxious, depressive and obsessive behaviors than those on regular diets - but treating their ...

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  • Health

    Why you should never drink after exercise, a scientist explains

    Watching many types of professional sport, we’ll often see players drinking the sponsor’s brand of alcohol on camera after the match.But given the state our bodies are in after exercise, and what alcohol does to our system, drinking after sport is a bad idea.High intensity actions such as running, jumping, tackling and changing direction create temporary muscle damage and soreness. If the exercise is of long enough duration, the fuel stored in our muscles for energy (glycogen) can become depleted too. Beer may seem like a nice post-exercise reward. But is the damage to your muscles worth it?In a hot or ...

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  • Health

    Teenagers and the agony of body image

    Just two per cent of female teenagers say they have never suffered from eating or body issues, according to a recent study. The study, from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, also found that only seven per cent of men never had issues around eating or with their bodies. 'This means that practically everyone is affected at some point by one of these concerning issues, which are harmful to their health and that could also affect the health of their future families,' lead author and professor Dianne Neumark-Sztainer said.  The most prevalent issues for both gender was unhealthy weight-control behaviors, and some ...

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    UK has fewer doctors, nurses and beds than other western countries, leading doctor warns

    The UK has fewer doctors, nurses and beds than other western countries, according to a leading doctor.Dr Chaand Nagpaul, council chariman of the British Medical Association (BMA), said: 'The NHS has been systematically and scandalously starved of resources for years.'It lacks doctors, it lacks nurses, it lacks beds.'It's not just the channel that separates us from our European neighbours, but a vast funding gap equating to 35,000 hospital beds or 10,000 doctors. We're being run ragged.'This comes after the Prime Minister Theresa May announced last week the NHS, which turns 70 next month, will receive an extra £20 billion a year ...

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    Father, 40, relies on photos after motorbike crash destroyed his ability to make new memories

    A dad has taken almost 10,000 snaps to document his life after a tragic motorbike crash completely destroyed his ability to make memories and left him like an 'Alzheimer's sufferer'. Nick McMahon, now 40, went out for a spin on his sports bike in 2011 when he clipped something in the road, flew off the bike and landed on his head.Although Mr McMahon was wearing a helmet, his brain smashed against the inside of his skull, causing irreparable damage to his frontal lobe – a part of the brain which controls memory and emotions.Now, unable to make new memories, he must take ...

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  • Health

    Revolutionary 'magic bullet' for prostate cancer

    A revolutionary 'magic bullet' that kills prostate tumour cells has cured patients given just weeks to live.Six out of 10 patients with an advanced form of the disease are in remission one year after undergoing the treatment, a Cypriot study found.The therapy uses a molecule that attaches itself to prostate tumour cells before releasing energy that destroys the cancer.   Researchers believe the 'amazing' treatment could have potential in others forms of cancer including brain, thyroid and kidney. Prostate cancer affects around 47,000 new men every year in the UK. The disease kills approximately 19 men per 100,000 annually in the US. 'Magic ...

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    Man's throat started to ROT after he swallowed bleach causing him to spend 2 weeks in intensive care

    A man spent two weeks in intensive care and had to be fed through a tube after he swallowed a bleach tablet by accident.The 65-year-old from Switzerland lost his voice and the flesh in his throat began to rot when he took the tablet after mistaking it for paracetamol. Medics did not know how best to treat the man's condition and originally gave him painkillers and observed him for six hours, hoping to sending him home.But then his condition took a turn for the worse and he lost his voice, had severe throat pain and could not breathe on his own.He ...

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  • Health

    Deep-sea sponges may stem the antibiotic-resistance crisis

    Deep-sea sponges could stem the antibiotic resistance crisis, new research suggests.Out of 50 sponges, more than half contain so-called 'good bacteria' that fight off life-threatening infections such as the notoriously difficult-to-treat superbug methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and C.difficile, a study found.Study author Dr Guojun Wang, from Florida Atlantic University, said: 'We found that deep-sea microorganisms are an attractive, untapped source for the discovery of anti-infective agents.'This comes after research released earlier this year suggested antibiotics buried in soil may curb the resistance crisis.Experts have previously warned antibiotic resistance poses 'as big a risk as terrorism'.A lack of new drugs combined ...

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Everyone went outside to smoke cloves and bitch about having to stay after for the State.

Jon Stewart on events following Charles — January 19, 1999