• Sciencetech

    Want to boost your child's language skills? Get them piano lessons!

    The smartest children don't read books — they play piano, a new study has found.Playing an instrument for just six months can noticeably improve a child's linguistic ability, according to the latest research.Compared to children who read, those who have learnt to play the piano were far superior in their detection of various sounds.But while the instrument can help with children's understanding of pitch and conversation, tickling the ivories has no affect on IQ, attention span or memory.  Playing the piano may make your child smarter, a study has found. Scientists found that musical training noticeably improves the linguistic ability of ...

    9029
  • Sciencetech

    Apple to release noise-cancelling AirPods and the HomePod 2.0

    Apple could refresh its entire line of audio-focused products as soon as next year. The iPhone maker is expected to release a new version of its wireless AirPods, a revamped HomePod and possibly a pair of high-quality, over-the-ear headphones, Bloomberg reported, citing sources close to the situation. Each of the items could hit the shelves by 2019. Apple is expected to release a new version of its wireless AirPods, a revamped HomePod and possibly a pair of high-quality, over-the-ear headphones as soon as next year For the AirPods, Apple could release two models next year: One would be a refreshed version of its current $159 ...

    9029
  • Sciencetech

    Scientists discover 124 DNA regions related to being neurotic

    Anxious people may have one less thing to worry about, after scientists discovered the genes for neuroticism are partly hereditary.It seems parents may be at least partially responsible for passing on DNA that can lead to the personality trait.Experts found 124 newly discovered genetic regions, containing 599 genes, that they say are related to neuroticism, in the largest study of its kind ever conducted. The results mean there are now 136 locations in the human genome which can predict if people are neurotic, of which only 12 were previously known.Being prone to worrying is also an important risk factor for a variety of psychiatric ...

    9029
  • Sciencetech

    Facebook patents show firm can predict when you'll die

    Facebook has been widely recognized for the extreme lengths it takes to collect data on its users.  But several recently filed patents show just how widespread those efforts have become, ranging from anticipating your daily routine to predicting when you might die.  What's more, many of these techniques simply rely on your smartphone's geolocation data in order to learn more about you and your habits.In perhaps one of the most shocking filings, Facebook researchers describe the ability to 'predict a life change event' for users, such as marriage status, birthdays, new jobs, a birth in the family, graduation, or even death.  Several ...

    9029
  • Sciencetech

    Julius Caesar had 'crazy bulge' on his head reveals 3D reconstruction

    Julius Caesar had a 'crazy bulge' on his head, a new 3D reconstruction of the infamous Roman leader has revealed. The National Museum of Antiquities in the Netherlands has revealed a new bust based on a recent 3D reconstruction of his face and head.The reconstruction was made using data from a 3D scan of a marble portrait in the museum's collection.  The National Museum of Antiquities in the Netherlands has revealed the new bust based on a recent 3D reconstruction of his face and head. It is believed the strange bump was caused during childbirth. WAS JULIUS CAESAR BORN BY CAESAREAN? The Ancient ...

    9029
  • Sciencetech

    US Navy reveals 'superslippery' paint for submarines and warships

    American military researchers have developed a radical new coating that could help submarines and boats slide through the water more easily.They says the radical 'omniphobic' coating could save millions in fuel costs - and keep them in pristine condition.The chemical coating is clear, durable, can be applied to numerous surfaces and sheds just about any liquid.  The Navy says the radical 'omniphobic' coating could save millions in fuel costs - and keep craft in pristine condition. Pictured, the attack submarine, Seawolf (SSN 21) HOW THE 'SUPERSLIPPY' COATING WORKS  The new material uses a very durable polymer matrix and a very repellent filler.To engineer ...

    9029
  • Sciencetech

    London's iconic Royal Observatory to open for first time in 60 years

    One of the most iconic locations in modern science will re-open its doors for the first time since 1957.London's Royal Observatory closed its roof to astronomers more than half a century ago after light pollution and high smog levels made observing the night sky almost impossible.Following the closure of the iconic observatory, researchers moved away from the UK's capital in a bid to find clearer skies.However, the Royal Observatory, located in Greenwich, now hopes to tempt them back with cutting-edge new telescope.The £50,000 ($66,000) Annie Maunder Astrographic Telescope (Amat) which honours a 'forgotten giant' of astronomy, is designed to avoid interference ...

    9029
  • Sciencetech

    'Fireball' asteroid that smashed into Earth was only detected after it collided with our planet

    A motorist's dashcam has captured the incredible moment a powerful 'fireball' asteroid exploded above Russia.The space rock was speeding at more than 32,000 miles per hour (52,000kph) when it fizzed over Earth, triggering a blinding flash across the early morning sky.The four-metre-wide (13ft) object slipped past Nasa's asteroid warning systems and was first spotted by sensors designed to catch nuclear explosions after it struck the planet's atmosphere with a force of three kilotons.Nasa warned last week of a vulnerability in its detection equipment that stops the space agency from picking out potentially deadly objects approaching from Earth's 'day side' until it ...

    9029
  • Sciencetech

    Your smartphone battery could reveal everything you read on your phone

    Your smartphone battery could reveal your intimate secrets without you ever knowing.Researchers have found a way to work out everything you type and read on your phone simply by studying your battery's power levels.To do this, they implanted a micro-controller into a phone's battery to record power flowing both in and out of the device.They then used an AI to match power flows with specific keystrokes. The technique could allow hackers to record your passwords, as well as monitor your most visited websites, the last time you used the camera and when you made a call. The attack requires the smartphone to be ...

    9029
  • Sciencetech

    Neanderthals used 7-foot long wooden spears to stab their prey

    Neanderthals were 'sophisticated hunters' who used wooden spears to stab their prey at close range. As well as sharp stabbing and thrusting motions, our ancient cousins also used complex hunting techniques which involved groups of people.Neanderthals would work together, under the cover of woodland, and ambush some of the huge beasts that roamed our planet in the distant past.Experts made the discovery by scanning the remains of their prey, some of which dated back as far as 120,000 years ago.  Neanderthals had to work hard for their food, and scientists have discovered that they used sharpened wooden spears to stab and ...

    9029
  • Sciencetech

    Hackers drop pornographic images into Nintendo's Super Mario Odyssey

    Pornographic images have started to appear on the side of balloons in Super Mario Odyssey, a video game popular with youngsters.Hackers have found a way to attach the adult images to the balloons, which appear as part of an online competitive challenge in the Nintendo Switch title.Experts believe they have gained access to a piece of software used by game creators, which has unlocked options that are usually hidden from public view.They have used this tool to override the cartoon avatars that normally appear on the balloons, and instead inserted their own smutty icons.Social media users were the first to raise ...

    9029
  • Sciencetech

    Is your MacBook keyboard playing up? Apple says it will fix some models for free

    Apple has confessed some of its laptops are breaking too easily, offering to fix its custom-designed keyboards for free years after the initial warranty has expired.The so-called 'butterfly keyboard' has received a flood of complaints after MacBook owners claimed keys would repeat unexpectedly, respond inconsistently, or stop working entirely on their notebooks.The design of the keyboard means MacBook owners are unable to remove debris trapped underneath the keys at home.As a result, Apple has announced it will be cover the costs of any keyboard replacements, and reimbursing those who have already footed the bill themselves.The new keyboard service programme covers ...

    9029
  • Sciencetech

    Today's youngsters can delay gratification longer than those of 1960s

    Technology has been blamed for causing children to crave constant stimulation because they can no longer control their impulses. But according a new study, young people today have more willpower than they did the 1960s and so are more likely to succeed. One explanation for the trend is there has been an increase IQ scores among children in the last several decades.This has been linked to improvements in technologies that give children a global view of the world and help them develop their skills faster, researchers claim.    Today's youngsters may be able to delay their gratification significantly longer to get an extra ...

    9029
  • Sciencetech

    Rare ‘relic galaxy' could unlock the secret about how the universe formed

    A rare galaxy stuck in a state of arrested development is providing scientists with a unique window into the early days of the universe.The unusual cosmic region has remained frozen for the past 10 billion years, producing no new stars in all of that time.This 'relic galaxy' gives off an unusual amount of red light, thanks to its proliferation of ancient stars, which researchers detected in satellite imagery.Experts say it could help them to unlock secrets about how the universe and its constituent galaxies formed, billions of years ago.  A rare galaxy stuck in a state of arrested development is providing scientists ...

    9029
  • Sciencetech

    Facebook wants to hide secret inaudible messages in TV ads that can force your phone to record audio

    Facebook wants to spy on you by hiding inaudible messages in TV ads.These secret messages would force your phone to record audio of your private conversations without you knowing, according to a patent application by the firm. Clips taken of your background conversations or movements across a room would help advertisers determine whether you are watching their promotions.    Facebook wants to hide secret messages in TV adverts so it can spy on your watching habits a new patent application reveals. This image from the application details how Facebook would use your television (top) to send messages to applications on your phone ...

    9029

Celebrity News

Quis autem vel eum iure reprehenderit qui in ea voluptate velit esse quam nihil molestiae consequatur, vel illum qui dolorem?

SUBSCRIBE

quotes

Everyone went outside to smoke cloves and bitch about having to stay after for the State.

Jon Stewart on events following Charles — January 19, 1999